Courses

Examples of Course description for courses offered in English for the Spring and Autumn terms

*You can search syllabus from the following link:

Course Title: Environmental Economics

Lecturer: Prof. Takahiro TSUGE

Course Description:Lectures on economic approaches to environmental issues will be provided. In this class, an explanation will be given on economic instruments of environmental policy, which is a policy tool to reduce environmental burden by utilizing market mechanisms. After explanation on market efficiency, market failures due to externalities, and internalization of externalities, economic approaches to climate change, waste issues, and biodiversity conservation are covered. Active learning such as discussions, group work, and presentations will be conducted while focusing on lectures. Feedback will be provided to the reaction paper.

Course Title: Introduction to Environmental Accounting

Lecturer: Hideki MURAI (Part-time lecturer)

Course Description: Environmental accounting aims at achieving sustainable development,maintaining a favorable relationship with the community, and pursuing effective and efficient environmental conservation activities. Disclosure of environmental accounting information is a key process in performing accountability. Consequently, environmental accounting helps companies and other organizations boost their public trust and confidence and are associated with receiving a fair assessment.

Course Title: Japanese Environmental Law

Lecturer: Prof. Akemi ORI

Course Description: Considering what is the significance and issues of Japanese environmental law, through comparative analysis of foreign environmental law structure and its influence to Japanese environmental law.

Course Title: Environment and Development in Developing Countries

Lecturer: Prof. John Joseph PUTHENKALAM

Course Description: Around 150 nations of the world are considered as developing economies. This course focuses on the various issues related with these countries, where the sustainability of the environment is challenged as economic development is pursued. Can we find a harmonization model of environment and development to overcome the existing problematic models of economic development? The concept of sustainable and human development is an intelligent response towards questions of our contemporary beings. Human well-being and sustainability should therefore be integrated in all areas of our studies. Consequently, let us try to design new harmonization models of development and environment where present generations can enjoy a decent standard of living while making sure that future generations also have a safe planet Earth to make their dwelling. This course would enable student to understand the problems as well as paths of solutions like UNSDGs that are open to developing countries.

Course Title: Environmental Assessment

Lecturer: Prof. Guangwei HUANG

Course Description: This course provides an introduction of environmental impact assessment. It explores the concept, knowledge and techniques for conducting the assessments that the environmental laws require. Case studies of environmental impact assessment are presented. At the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate basic skills in using various techniques and approaches to identify and mitigate a project's impacts to air, water, land, and cultural resources.

Course Title: Global Environmental Policy

Lecturer: Prof. Anne MCDONALD

Course Description: Environmental policy is relatively new to the global stage of policy dialogue and initiatives. This course will explore the environmental degradation and causes that catalyzed global level inter-governmental policy discussions leading to United Nations conventions and protocols, among other global level policy initiatives.
In order to better understand environmental degradation and its challenges, as well as what drives global environmental policy design and implementation, the social, cultural, economic and political mechanisms that advance and/or hinder environmental protectionism at the global level will also be explored.
It is the aim of this course to help students further both their ability to analyze environmental problems and their understanding of global environmental policy.
* lectures may be subject to change

Course Title: Environmental History

Lecturer: Prof. Anne MCDONALD

Course Description: Environmental history has been described as the Earth’s birds-eye view of global history. How humans and their activities have influenced environmental change and conversely how changes in the natural environmental have impacted human society throughout history are central questions explored in the interdisciplinary study of environmental history. An academic discipline that evolved from concern over growing environmental degradation and change, it is a discipline not only concerned with the past, but aims to explore working solutions for current and future environmental problems by understanding how humans have interacted with the natural environment throughout their existence on the globe.
This course will focus on the 14 to early 20th Century, a time in history often referred to as the era of European colonialism and frontier expansionism. The reason for this focus is that it was the dawn of environmental degradation on a global scale. An understanding of this time in human history is critical to understanding contemporary society’s complex global environmental issues and challenges.

Course Title: Economical Valuation of the Natural Environment

Lecturer: Prof. Takahiro TSUGE

Course Description: In this class, the environmental valuation methods, those are methods for evaluating the economic value of the environment, are explained using the economic valuation of the natural environment as examples. In addition, students will learn concrete analysis procedures through practical training using a personal computer. Active learning such as discussions, group work, and presentations will be conducted while focusing on lectures. Feedback will be provided to the reaction paper.
Next, I will explain the generation, development and attenuation mechanisms of weather and climate phenomena. The influences that they exert on the local and remote places will also be covered in the lecture. The elements of climate variations will be explained; in particular the processes associated with tropical climate phenomena such as Indian Ocean Dipoles, La Nina/El Nino and the El Nino Modoki in the Pacific Ocean will be explained in details. I will also briefly explain about the history of the climate research and the relationship between the climate and the society with an emphasis on the applications of climate derivatives. At the end of the course, I will cover the topics of global warming and climate change projections with views on their possible implications on the short- and long term changes in the global climate system.

Course Title: Environment and Sustainable Lifestyles

Lecturer: Prof. Keiko HIRAO

Course Description: The goal of this course is to raise sensitivities for the interdependence of ecosystems, economic systems and social systems, with particular interest in the concept of social sustainability, which refers to processes that generate social health and well-being as well as the institutions that facilitate environmental and economic sustainability now and for the future. Based on the reading materials listed in this syllabus, we will work together to clarify and develop our joint understanding of the concept of social sustainability by surveying possible definitions and measurements of social sustainability; investigating the relationship between social sustainability and other aspects of sustainability; and exploring the cases that attempt to achieve sustainability at local, regional and global scales. Specific topics to be explored may include: the natural and social scientific principles and theories underlying sustainability, the different and often conflicting cultural and disciplinary perspectives of sustainability, how to quantify the impacts of lifestyle choices on the environment and resource use, philosophical and practical approaches for achieving sustainable lifestyles and socio-ecological systems. The details are subject to change according to the needs and levels of the students.

Course Title: Marine Environmental Policy

Lecturer: Prof. Anne McDONALD

Course Description: Environmental policy is relatively new to the global stage of policy dialogue and initiatives. Much of the environmental policy efforts to date are land-based leaving 70% of the globe’s environment, the ocean/marine environment, often ignored or shut out from mainstream policy initiatives.
The ocean is in a crisis, threatened by adverse human activities such as overfishing and degradation of marine habitats. Scientists estimate that 45% of the main marine fish stocks or species are overexploited, that large predatory fish have declined by 90% and coral reefs - ‘the rainforests of the sea’ and home to one-third of all known marine species, are in peril. From the local community-based management level to global policy of multilateral environmental agreements, there is a serious need for more people with a solid scientific foundation as a researcher of the oceans in policy.
This course will explore the marine environmental policy first from a global perspective on what has driven marine environmental policy from the 20th Century and then take a more local view of efforts from countries around the world to develop marine environmental policies. We will thus be looking at United Nation related multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) but also look at case studies from different countries to try and get both a global outlook and understanding but also understand the challenges and potentials of marine environmental policy from the local level.

Course Title: Global Environment Outlook

Lecturer: Prof. Guangwei HUANG

Course Description: This is a multidisciplinary course that focuses on climate change in relation to various environmental issues such as aquatic ecosystem degradation, water resources and air pollution. It also addresses the intensification of flood disasters due to global warming. Besides, students will learn basic environmental data analysis and gain knowledge on environmental indicators.

Course Title: Business Strategies for Sustainability

Lecturer: Prof. Masachika SUZUKI

Course Description: Sustainability is becoming an increasingly important area for corporate managers (and for public policymakers) to handle in global business operations. Climate change is an example of sustainability issues. What strategic and management vision to demonstrate towards global climate change is becoming a key strategic and managerial issue for the companies in the energy-intensive industry sectors. Human rights are another example of sustainability issues. For the companies operating in the developing countries (such as oil and gas, chemical, pulp and paper, and trading companies), poor strategy and management of human rights often addresses serious risk to their business in the global market.
This course introduces concepts and practices of business strategies for sustainability. We will examine several company case studies through the course to understand how the leading companies cope with different sustainability issues such as human rights, the environment, product safety and labor relations. Through the case studies, we will explore how companies strategize and operationalize sustainability issues in practice. We will also pay attentions to the roles of different stakeholders surrounding them including customers, shareholders and employees as well as suppliers, financial institutions, governments and local communities.
In addition, we will look into the business cases of the base-of-the-pyramid and Creating Shared Value (CSV). We observe that in some cases, successful business models and operations lead to the improvement of social and economic conditions of the people around the world.

Course Title: Environmental Resourse Management Policy

Lecturer: Prof. Shingo SHIBATA

Course Description: Understand essentials issues of contemporay environmental resource management policy to formulate a sustainable nature-harmonized, recycling and low-carbon society, ranging from local-level conservation problems to regional, global-level environmental problems. At this semester, a topic of “Participatory/collaborative environmental policy planning/decision-making" will be focused, and each student will conduct a case study on this subject, conduct a presentation at the final lecture, and write a report. In addition, a guest lecture may be arranged on a specific subject.

Course Title: Ecology and the Environment

Lecturer: Prof. Yoshinari TANAKA

Course Description: This course outlines fundamental principles and applications of ecology, evolutionary biology, and conservation biology. These subjects are essential for deep understanding and relevant solutions of all environmental issues that are related to the loss of biodiversity and the degradation of ecosystem function, which are concerned as one of the most important global environmental problems. The protection of rare endangered species, the invasion of exotic species, and ecosystem changes by the global warming and the eutrophication will be treated as up-to-date environmental issues, whereas the ecological and evolutionary principles behind these phenomena will be focused on.

Course Title: Waste Management in Asia

Lecturer: Prof. Akemi ORI

Course Description: As the international community is to diversify, in order to construct a Recycling-based Society, we need to think about the waste management not only in Japan but also in the entire Asia.

Course Title: Energy and Environmental Technology

Lecturer: Prof. Masachika SUZUKI

Course Description: To solve energy and environmental crisis, the innovation and diffusion of new, clean and dynamic technologies are crucial. The innovation and diffusion of the technologies bring new and exciting business opportunities likewise in future sustainable society. This class overviews a landscape of energy and environmental technologies. Part of the class introduces a research project where students select a technology of their interest and investigate potentials and barriers in innovating and/or diffusion the technology of their choice. The research questions for this project include: 1) how the technology help to solve energy and environmental crisis; 2) what level of business opportunities exist in the development of the technology and: 3) what benefit the technology may bring to society. Moreover, the project is designed for students to highlight the barriers in the development and address roles of the public (national and local government) and private actors (companies) in promoting them.

Course Title: Ecological Risk Assesment of Pollutants

Lecturer: Prof. Yoshinari TANAKA

Course Description: The modern material civilization is based on numerous chemical substances, some of which have adverse effects on the ecosystem and the human health. Sustainable development of the socio-economic system needs to utilize beneficial chemicals that are efficient for facilitating human welfare under an appropriate risk management of the chemicals. This course will give an introduction to ecotoxicology (environmental toxicology), environmental chemistry, and the risk assessment of chemicals. Environmental toxicities of chemicals are mainly categorized into ecosystem effects and human health effects. This course will cover the entire range of toxicities as regards the mechanism or mode of action, the method of quantification, and the risk assessment method, whereas the emphasis will be put on the ecological effect of pollutants.

Course Title: Global Forest Conservation Policy

Lecturer: Prof. Shingo SHIBATA

Course Description: Students will be guided to understand an overall picture of complex global forest and natural resource conservation issues at local, national, regional and global level, including comparative historical policy reviews, and analyses of various policy measures taken such as ecosystem-based management approach, participatory/collaborative management/planning and trade-off analysis, PES/REDD. Student is required to select a specific case study of their interest, and conduct an oral presentation at the last class, and submit a written report on the study, in addition to regular class readings, (group) presentations and reaction papers.

Course Title: Strategic Environmental Management

Lecturer: Prof. Masachika SUZUKI

Course Description: Recently, we see more extreme, sometimes catastrophic events in many parts of the world. Scientists demonstrate better evidence indicating the link between our economic activities and the environmental degradation. We are beginning to realize that environmental issues are no longer negligible in business operations. Negligence of the issues may result in serious economic loss for a company. On the other hand, many companies have begun to recognize environmental management as a way forward to generate profitable opportunities. Toyota made a major investment to produce hybrid cars. The hybrid cars have been sold well in the international market. DuPont placed research and development efforts in producing alternative chemical to the ozone-depleting CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons). The company successfully developed alternative chemical to CFCs and altered its strategic position on international regulation (Montreal Protocol) to ban CFCs.
This course introduces essential concepts of strategic environmental management as well as leading practices of environmental management. To begin with, we will review essential theoretical approaches in strategic environmental management. Through the review, we will be able to gain conceptual foundation on this subject. We will use several case studies to help us understand environmental management in practice. We will then explore the linkages between concepts and practices.

Course Title: Uran Sustainability

Lecturer: Prof. Xuepeng QIAN

Urban sustainability has become one of the major issues for sustainable development, with the increasing urban population (50% of global population) and expansion (95%) (United Nations, 2014), listed as “Goal 11 sustainable cities and communities” in SDGs. This course is organized in the flow of Plan-Implementation-Assessment to provide a holistic view of urban planning and management for sustainability transformation. Topics such as transportation, energy, urban metabolism, green infrastructure, food and water will be explained and discussed for exploring the visions of urban sustainability. Public-private-partnership, innovation will be covered in implementation part to understand the urban transformation. Theory, indicators, and challenges will be explained in the last part of assessing urban sustainability. Group presentations related future visions and good practices are scheduled too.

Course Title: Industrial Ecology

Lecturer: Prof. Xuepeng QIAN

Industrial ecology is a methodology based on systems engineering that helps to proactively and rationally approach and maintain desired environmental capacities or carrying capacities of the earth, subject to continued economic, cultural, and technological progress. Industrial ecology is an interdisciplinary field, and an organizing concept that is increasingly applied to define the interactions of today’s industry (technology), environmental and social systems. Toward the sustainable society, these interactions need to be re-considered and modified, where some important analysis and assessment methods have been developed in industrial ecology. Industrial ecology serves as an environmentally related framework for technology, policy, and resource management in government and society, which will be focused in the course.

Starting from the background and concepts of industrial ecology, this course will guide students in learning methodologies and practical applications of industrial ecology, such as material flow analysis, life cycle assessment (LCA) of products and services, and industrial symbiosis, as well as the systems approach used in them. Furthermore, we will elucidate the relationship between development and the environment from the angles of industry, environment, and society.

Course Title: Environmental Science of Human Health

Lecturer: Prof. Sumiko ANNO

Course Description: The course introduces the environmental systems, emphasizing the complex interactions between human health/body and toxic physical, chemical, or biological agents in the environment, resulting from human activities. Topics include how the body reacts to physical, chemical, or biological agents in the environment, such as the impacts of global warming on human health.

Course Title: Ecological Risk Assesment of Pollutants

Lecturer: Prof. Yoshinari TANAKA

Course Description: The modern material civilization is based on numerous chemical substances, some of which have adverse effects on the ecosystem and the human health. Sustainable development of the socio-economic system needs to utilize beneficial chemicals that are efficient for facilitating human welfare under an appropriate risk management. This course will give an introduction to ecotoxicology (environmental toxicology), environmental chemistry, and the risk assessment of chemicals. Environmental toxicities of chemicals are mainly categorized into ecosystem effects and human health effects. This course will cover the entire range of toxicities as regards the mechanism or mode of action, the method of quantification, and the risk assessment method, whereas the emphasis will be put on the ecological effect of pollutants.

Course Title: Frontier of Environmental Studies

Lecturer: Prof. Yoshinari TANAKA

Course Description: An omnibus lecture series given by 13 frontier scientists invited mainly from National Institute for Environmental Studies (Tsukuba, Japan), which has led environmental studies in Japan. The lecture topics cover a wide range of environmental issues including the global warming, the material recycling, the risk assessment of chemicals, the biodiversity loss, the waste treatment, the protection of mangrove forests, and so on. The fundamental scientific knowledge behind these issues is essential for all students of environmental studies.

*Courses and/or lecturers may be subject to change.